Tag Hiromart Gallery

In Tokyo today: Sensual realism in contemporary stillebens

In Claudia Ahlering’s exhibition Still Alive opening this evening in Tokyo, the tradition of stilleben is being both celebrated and challenged by beautifully executed oil paintings on canvas. In the tombs of ancient Egypt walls were decorated with paintings of food objects as it was believed that the depicted items would become available to the deceased in the afterlife. The fascination with painting innate objects, most commonly placed on a table, has stayed with painters and we have seen many bold and successful takes over the years, although I do not remembering seeing a ring finger amongst carrots before; a ring finger with a glistening wedding ring still attached to it. In this bright and painterly composition with soft and warm colours, the dry and moldy carrots are placed in a pile on the floor next to a piece of furniture and a pair of white ladies shoes. Although the carrots have seen better days, the small green leaves are eagerly reaching up towards the light, and in this way life and death are interfacing each other throughout the exhibition.

Still Alive is Hamburg artist Ahlering’s second exhibition at Hiromart Gallery and although the opening is colliding with a possible encounter with the typhoon Jelawat threatening to approach Japan, gallery owner Hiromi Nishiyama is sticking to the schedule. Hiromi is known to defy natural catastrophes in the name of art since April 2011, when Ahlering’s Japan debut opened six weeks after Japan was struck by the massive earthquake, the tsunami and the nuclear disaster. Hiromi recalls the event: “During that difficult time art was more important than ever before. Sometimes we need art to escape reality and at that time the exhibition made us all feel much better as we were able to have a good time and enjoy Claudia’s creations.”

Sensual portraits of young people embodying immortality, whose radiant skin seems to reflect the beauty and the softness of the flowers resting next to their bodies, continue to comment on the fragility and possibility of time. When asked whether her Japanese visitors will appreciate the dark humor and the feminist slant, Hiromi is certain that Still Alive will be met with awe and curiosity in the gallery which is now filled with an unusually strong smell of oil paint. The Japanese art lovers have a lot to discover at Hiromart Gallery, which is one of very few Tokyo galleries dealing in International art. It is both amusing and heart-warming for the gallery owner to be a pioneer in this field. “There must be a different kind of oil paint that they use in Europe? I am looking forward to seeing how people will react to it.”


“Tom” by Claudia Ahlering, now exhibited at Hiromart Gallery

Promotional links::

www.hiromartgallery.com

www.claudiaahlering.de

Art quote:: Japanese art connoisseur at the age of six

One day a six year old convinced his mother that they must enter the contemporary art gallery Hiromart Gallery in Tokyo, located amongst Japanese gardens and frequently visited by an International crowd thanks to the neighboring hotels. After having spent a good two and a half hour indulging critically in the art works, the young man decided which painting he loved the most. The mother tried to convince her son that the smallest (and therefore the cheapest) painting was his favorite, but he was not impressed by the colors in the small painting. Gallery owner Hiromi was watching with great surprise when the six year old signed the contract and declared the painting sold.

From feature Robin Fry’s glittering ‘Golden Altitudes’ at Hiromart Gallery in Tokyo

Photo: Tokugawa Ieyasu

 

From feature Robin Fry’s glittering ‘Golden Altitudes’ at Hiromart Gallery in Tokyo

 

Robin Fry’s glittering ‘Golden Altitudes’ at Hiromart Gallery in Tokyo

One day a six year old convinced his mother that they must enter the contemporary art gallery Hiromart Gallery in Tokyo, located amongst Japanese gardens and frequently visited by an International crowd thanks to the neighboring hotels. After having spent a good two and a half hour indulging critically in the art works, the young man decided which painting he loved the most. The mother tried to convince her son that the smallest (and therefore the cheapest) painting was his favorite, but he was not impressed by the colors in the small painting. Gallery owner Hiromi was watching with great surprise when the six year old signed the contract and declared the painting sold.

The art world in Tokyo is small but full of surprises and steadily growing thanks to commercial gallery owners like Hiromi, who has a great passion for private and affordable art. The Japanese are learning to appreciate the free admission, the possibility to invest in a work of art and to experience International art in real life. The current exhibition ‘Golden Altitudes’ by Canadian artist Robin Fry based in Berlin, is accompanied by a sound installation created by the artist specifically for the show. The music brings the audience to a sonic environment described as ‘a fictional vacation planet with a Jamaican theme’. Since the Tokyo crowd is still not used to the free admission and find it embarrassing to enter a gallery without purchasing a work, the sound installation might assist in tickling the curiosity of the visitors to the point where they forget to be embarrassed. This is the first time Hiromi is exhibiting painting and sound installation by the same artist. “The visitors find the sound installation very interesting and it gives them a deeper experience of Robin’s work, which is unique and very beautiful. There are plants and flowers, but of a kind you have never seen before. I play the sound installation throughout the exhibition and I am not shy with the volume.”

The Canadian painter Robin Fry created a series of small-scaled paintings and drawings for ‘Golden Altitudes’, a title which came to subconsciously inspire the artist to use a lot of golden glitter. “I was thinking about the Golden Triangle when I chose the title of the exhibition, it just felt right. Altitude is related to height and triangles and even though I can’t explain why, it felt like a good and positive title to work against. I paint very intuitively and I suddenly realized half way through that I was using a lot of golden glitter, without literarily referencing to the title. I might have been inspired subconsciously.”

To exhibit in Tokyo is a great opportunity for the interdisciplinary artist to reach a wider audience, but although Robin would have loved to be at the show, other commitments forced him to stay put in front of the eisel in Berlin. Golden Altitudes is on until the 16th of September and has received a positive response from both visitors and Japanese media.

Robin Fry – Merlin’s Den, Now exhibited at Hiromart Gallery

Robin Fry – Cardboard Hideaway, Now exhibited at Hiromart Gallery

Robin Fry – Green Glass, Now exhibited at Hiromart Gallery

Promotional links::

www.hiromartgallery.com

www.robinfry.com